I'll Remember April

This lovely day will lengthen into evening,

We'll sigh good-bye to all we've ever had,

Alone where we have walked together,

I'll remember April and be glad....

 

I'll be content; you loved me once in April,

Your lips were warm, and love an' spring were new,

But I'm not afraid of autumn, and her sorrow,

For I'll remember, (Iíll remember)

April and you! (Iíll remember)

 

The fire will dwindle into glowing ashes,

For flames and love live such a little while . . .

I won't forget, but I won't be lonely, (Oh, no . . .)

I'll remember April, and I'll smile . . .

 

The fire will dwindle into glowing ashes,

For flames and love live such a little while (a little while)

 

I won't forget, but I won't be lonely (I won't be lonely)

I'll remember April, and I'll smile . . .

 

I won't forget but I won't be lonely, no . . .

I'll remember April, and I'll smile!

 

This lovely day will fade away....

 

~ from the 1942 Western Musical Comedy "Ride 'em Cowboy"

Music by Gene DePaul and lyrics by Patricia Johnston, and Don Raye

 

A superbly performed, beautiful collection ~ By Request

 

 


 

I'll Remember April

~ from the 1942 Western Musical Comedy "Ride 'em Cowboy"

Music by Gene DePaul and lyrics by Patricia Johnston, and Don Raye 

Leeds Music Corp. ASCAP

 

With Mitchell Ayres' Orchestra

and The Ray Charles Singers

Produced by Hugo & Luigi

 

Recorded in Webster Hall, New York City

Recording Engineer: Bob Simpson

Recording Time 3:00

 

Recorded June 21st, 1962   ~  Matrix No. N5PW-3018 Take 6

 

Album issue: RCA-LP12 "By Request" LSP-2567 STEREO SEPTEMBER 1962

 

By Request ~ 1962

 

 

Notes: ~ introduced by Dick Foran in the 1942 Abbott and Costello Western Musical Comedy "Ride 'em Cowboy" with Ella Fitzgerald and the Merry Macs singing tunes including "A Tisket A Tasket" and Foran crooning "I'll Remember April."

 

Notes: ~ " For a few brief minutes, "I'll Remember April" was an oasis of sanity in the madness of the 1942 Abbott and Costello film "Ride 'Em Cowboy." Dick Foran, the handsome square-jawed hero on the Universal set, sang the song in its film debut. For a long time it remained a love song, but then the jazz players, who loved, discovered it's chord structure and found it a perfect vehicle for endless improvisation. In Perry's hands, it's a love song again, and he seems to caress it with his voice. It's a fine performance, one of Perry's best. "

 

(Notes from "The Incomparable Como" Readers Digest UK compilation 1975)